up!
wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."
"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."
"But I miss them.”
"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”
"It’s not the same."
"I know. I’m sorry."
"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"
"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."
"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"
"Yeah, that sounds better."
"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"
"I don’t see why not."
"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”
"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."
"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."
"You got it, evolution. Anytime."
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."

"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."

"But I miss them.”

"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”

"It’s not the same."

"I know. I’m sorry."

"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"

"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."

"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"

"Yeah, that sounds better."

"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"

"I don’t see why not."

"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”

"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."

"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."

"You got it, evolution. Anytime."

Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

(via somuchscience)

Aug 10   6,304 notes   Hi-Res

stuckinabucket:

Okay, so sea apples (generae Pseudocolochirus, Paracucumaria) are a type of sea cucumber, which yes, I know, terribly fucking helpful.
Sea cucumbers:

Like if a slug and a cucumber had babies capable of spitting their guts at you if you upset them!
 Weirdly enough, these guys are actually echinoderms, so they’re up there with urchins and starfish.
Anyway, sea apples are a bit more colorful and a lot more round than most sea cucumbers, so they got a really fantastically imaginative name.

Above: A sea apple with its feeding tentacles extruded.
Sea apples filter plankton from the water with those suckers.  When they’re in danger, or sleeping, they schlorp them right back into their bodies like the picture up top shows.
Those little yellow nubbies running down its sides in stripes are tube feet.  Tube feet!

Above: Some motherfuckin’ tube feet, aw yeah. (Motherfuckin’ tube feet attached to a starfish.)
Sea apples mostly use theirs to keep themselves attached to shelter and the substrate, but they are capable of using them to travel.  They are also capable of spitting their guts out if a predator keeps harassing them once they’ve sucked in their tentacles, but they’re not really capable of running away on their tube feet.

Above: A starfish running away on its tube feet.
Below: A sea apple giving it the good old college try.

What they can do when they really need to get gone is suck in their tentacles, retract their tube feet, inhale in a shitload of water, and just nope-roll the fuck out of dodge on the next wave.
If you ever see these guys in an aquarium, they’ll probably have the tank to themselves.  It’s way easier to feed them this way (plankton-eaters are generally kind of a pain in the ass to keep healthy with other animals present), and also if something gets them to spit out their guts, they might also just spit out a load of poison with it, because nope-rolling isn’t the fastest way anything’s ever escaped in the ocean, and they need something to buy time. 
If they do this in the ocean, no big.  If they do this in an aquarium, it’s kind of like just screaming “Ah, motherland!” and stabbing a map with a Swiss army knife.

stuckinabucket:

Okay, so sea apples (generae Pseudocolochirus, Paracucumaria) are a type of sea cucumber, which yes, I know, terribly fucking helpful.

Sea cucumbers:

Like if a slug and a cucumber had babies capable of spitting their guts at you if you upset them!

 Weirdly enough, these guys are actually echinoderms, so they’re up there with urchins and starfish.

Anyway, sea apples are a bit more colorful and a lot more round than most sea cucumbers, so they got a really fantastically imaginative name.

Above: A sea apple with its feeding tentacles extruded.

Sea apples filter plankton from the water with those suckers.  When they’re in danger, or sleeping, they schlorp them right back into their bodies like the picture up top shows.

Those little yellow nubbies running down its sides in stripes are tube feet.  Tube feet!

Above: Some motherfuckin’ tube feet, aw yeah. (Motherfuckin’ tube feet attached to a starfish.)

Sea apples mostly use theirs to keep themselves attached to shelter and the substrate, but they are capable of using them to travel.  They are also capable of spitting their guts out if a predator keeps harassing them once they’ve sucked in their tentacles, but they’re not really capable of running away on their tube feet.

Above: A starfish running away on its tube feet.

Below: A sea apple giving it the good old college try.

What they can do when they really need to get gone is suck in their tentacles, retract their tube feet, inhale in a shitload of water, and just nope-roll the fuck out of dodge on the next wave.

If you ever see these guys in an aquarium, they’ll probably have the tank to themselves.  It’s way easier to feed them this way (plankton-eaters are generally kind of a pain in the ass to keep healthy with other animals present), and also if something gets them to spit out their guts, they might also just spit out a load of poison with it, because nope-rolling isn’t the fastest way anything’s ever escaped in the ocean, and they need something to buy time. 

If they do this in the ocean, no big.  If they do this in an aquarium, it’s kind of like just screaming “Ah, motherland!” and stabbing a map with a Swiss army knife.

(via alex-does-science)

Aug 09   1,258 notes

(Source: whataregifs, via astro-stoner)

Aug 07   588,847 notes

llbwwb:

Hedgehog in clover by Shelly Laver

llbwwb:

Hedgehog in clover by Shelly Laver

(via modestanimalboi)

Aug 07   3,241 notes   Hi-Res

It’s been a long long time since my last post on tumblr :c

sinobug:

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomisidae)
 See other images of spiders of the family Thomisidae in my photostream HERE.

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae. 

Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects. 

Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards. 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Flower Crab Spider (Thomisus labefactus, Thomisidae)

See other images of spiders of the family Thomisidae in my photostream HERE.

Crab spider is a common name applied loosely to many species of spiders, but most consistently to members of the family Thomisidae.

Thomisidae do not build webs to trap prey, though all of them produce silk for drop lines and sundry reproductive purposes; some are wandering hunters and the most widely known are ambush predators. Some species sit on or beside flowers or fruit, where they grab visiting insects.

Rationalisation for the name crab spider is generally subjective and anecdotal. It is commonly said to refer to a fancied resemblance to crabs, or to the way such spiders hold their two front pairs of legs, or their ability to scuttle sideways or backwards.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese spiders and arachnids on my Flickr site HERE…..

Aug 01   75 notes   Hi-Res

wapiti3:

Toadstools, mushrooms, Fungi, edible and poisonous; one thousand American Fungi; how to select and cook the edible; how to distinguish and avoid the poisonous, with full botanic descriptions, by Charles McIlvaine … and Robert K. Macadam. on Flickr.

Publication info Indianapolis,The Bobbs-Merrill company[c1912]
Contributing Library:
University of California Libraries
BioDiv. Library

(via mycology)

Aug 01   356 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Jon Bentley

In Jon’s latest oil paintings, ‘Peter and Jane, the Lost Episodes’, he succeeds in recontextualising commonplace scenes with unexpected and absurdly humorous interventions…

Work from this series was recently included in The Threadneedle Prize for Painting and Sculpture 2013.

(via blackkittenclan)

Jun 29   9,996 notes

omgplants:

I just came across this in my planty searches…OMG! I wish I could get some better pictures of this plant. Brunsvigia bosmaniae.

omgplants:

I just came across this in my planty searches…OMG! I wish I could get some better pictures of this plant. Brunsvigia bosmaniae.

(via arrowtongue)

Jun 09   174 notes   Hi-Res