up!

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Wavellite - Avant mine, Garland Co., Arkansas

(Source: spiriferminerals.com, via scienceyoucanlove)

Aug 23   573 notes

realmonstrosities:

A deep sea octopus making shapes.

Octopods like this have long, fleshy spikes known as cirri lining their arms. It’s thought they’re used to create a current which draws copepods to the mouth.

There are a whole bunch of deep sea octopods with mantle fins and cirri, all belonging to a suborder called cirrata. Few are as colourful as this one, though!

…Video: EVNautilus

(via astro-stoner)

Aug 23   977 notes

mamashug:

doyinoyen:

After I read “A Mango-Shaped Space” I was pretty obsessed with synesthesia and did extensive research (read: lots of googling) on it, but primarily on sound color synesthesia since it was the one mainly explored in the book.

I learned about ordinal-linguistic personification just a few months ago. My letters and numbers have always had personalities and now I know it’s… a thing.

ordinal-linguistic personification is my thing too! 

(Source: psicologicamenteblog, via abraxasmalfoy)

Aug 23   17,872 notes

tokinw-tolkien:

gratefully-dabbed:

glazed-and-kinda-dazed:

d-dracarys-s:

acidlipgloss:

photoatlas:

Colorado Appreciation Post

“We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us.” 
― John Muir

I’m coming for you Colorado.

I would like to visit Colorado

My home<33

Couldnt imagine life anywhere else

303 love ya’ll

(via astro-stoner)

Aug 23   44,098 notes

It would be nice if someone  came with me to see a weird movie, smoke some weed and make out with music like Radiohead or Pixies…

Aug 23   1 note   Reblog

wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."
"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."
"But I miss them.”
"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”
"It’s not the same."
"I know. I’m sorry."
"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"
"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."
"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"
"Yeah, that sounds better."
"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"
"I don’t see why not."
"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”
"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."
"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."
"You got it, evolution. Anytime."
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."

"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."

"But I miss them.”

"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”

"It’s not the same."

"I know. I’m sorry."

"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"

"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."

"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"

"Yeah, that sounds better."

"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"

"I don’t see why not."

"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”

"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."

"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."

"You got it, evolution. Anytime."

Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

(via somuchscience)

Aug 10   7,301 notes   Hi-Res

stuckinabucket:

Okay, so sea apples (generae Pseudocolochirus, Paracucumaria) are a type of sea cucumber, which yes, I know, terribly fucking helpful.
Sea cucumbers:

Like if a slug and a cucumber had babies capable of spitting their guts at you if you upset them!
 Weirdly enough, these guys are actually echinoderms, so they’re up there with urchins and starfish.
Anyway, sea apples are a bit more colorful and a lot more round than most sea cucumbers, so they got a really fantastically imaginative name.

Above: A sea apple with its feeding tentacles extruded.
Sea apples filter plankton from the water with those suckers.  When they’re in danger, or sleeping, they schlorp them right back into their bodies like the picture up top shows.
Those little yellow nubbies running down its sides in stripes are tube feet.  Tube feet!

Above: Some motherfuckin’ tube feet, aw yeah. (Motherfuckin’ tube feet attached to a starfish.)
Sea apples mostly use theirs to keep themselves attached to shelter and the substrate, but they are capable of using them to travel.  They are also capable of spitting their guts out if a predator keeps harassing them once they’ve sucked in their tentacles, but they’re not really capable of running away on their tube feet.

Above: A starfish running away on its tube feet.
Below: A sea apple giving it the good old college try.

What they can do when they really need to get gone is suck in their tentacles, retract their tube feet, inhale in a shitload of water, and just nope-roll the fuck out of dodge on the next wave.
If you ever see these guys in an aquarium, they’ll probably have the tank to themselves.  It’s way easier to feed them this way (plankton-eaters are generally kind of a pain in the ass to keep healthy with other animals present), and also if something gets them to spit out their guts, they might also just spit out a load of poison with it, because nope-rolling isn’t the fastest way anything’s ever escaped in the ocean, and they need something to buy time. 
If they do this in the ocean, no big.  If they do this in an aquarium, it’s kind of like just screaming “Ah, motherland!” and stabbing a map with a Swiss army knife.

stuckinabucket:

Okay, so sea apples (generae Pseudocolochirus, Paracucumaria) are a type of sea cucumber, which yes, I know, terribly fucking helpful.

Sea cucumbers:

Like if a slug and a cucumber had babies capable of spitting their guts at you if you upset them!

 Weirdly enough, these guys are actually echinoderms, so they’re up there with urchins and starfish.

Anyway, sea apples are a bit more colorful and a lot more round than most sea cucumbers, so they got a really fantastically imaginative name.

Above: A sea apple with its feeding tentacles extruded.

Sea apples filter plankton from the water with those suckers.  When they’re in danger, or sleeping, they schlorp them right back into their bodies like the picture up top shows.

Those little yellow nubbies running down its sides in stripes are tube feet.  Tube feet!

Above: Some motherfuckin’ tube feet, aw yeah. (Motherfuckin’ tube feet attached to a starfish.)

Sea apples mostly use theirs to keep themselves attached to shelter and the substrate, but they are capable of using them to travel.  They are also capable of spitting their guts out if a predator keeps harassing them once they’ve sucked in their tentacles, but they’re not really capable of running away on their tube feet.

Above: A starfish running away on its tube feet.

Below: A sea apple giving it the good old college try.

What they can do when they really need to get gone is suck in their tentacles, retract their tube feet, inhale in a shitload of water, and just nope-roll the fuck out of dodge on the next wave.

If you ever see these guys in an aquarium, they’ll probably have the tank to themselves.  It’s way easier to feed them this way (plankton-eaters are generally kind of a pain in the ass to keep healthy with other animals present), and also if something gets them to spit out their guts, they might also just spit out a load of poison with it, because nope-rolling isn’t the fastest way anything’s ever escaped in the ocean, and they need something to buy time. 

If they do this in the ocean, no big.  If they do this in an aquarium, it’s kind of like just screaming “Ah, motherland!” and stabbing a map with a Swiss army knife.

(via alex-does-science)

Aug 09   1,258 notes

(Source: whataregifs, via astro-stoner)

Aug 07   596,855 notes

llbwwb:

Hedgehog in clover by Shelly Laver

llbwwb:

Hedgehog in clover by Shelly Laver

(via modestanimalboi)

Aug 07   3,692 notes   Hi-Res